7 Stoic Exercises to Relax and Be Calm

1. Don’t Give A Fuck Practice

Seriously, Don’t Give A Fuck about other people’s opinions, any of them. You cannot control what anyone thinks of you, so why worry? Fear of being ostracized from the herd is in our DNA. If you got cut from the herd, you died. That isn’t the case anymore. 

Practice — Saying things that go against the grain. Do not follow trends. Do not gossip to curry favour. Do not follow mass hysteria. By doing these things, you expose yourself to situations where people will judge you negatively. You will realize that it doesn’t kill you, or hurt you too much. 

2. Negative Visualization Practice

Pessimism is under rated. We are taught to picture the day ahead with positive attitude. Don’t. 

Practice — Thinking about the very worst things that can happen in your day ahead —  the worst — death of a loved one, your death. At the end of the day, when these things do not happen, you will cherish your life more. 

3. Self Control Practice 

You can control — Opinion, Pursuit, Desire & Aversion

You cannot control — Body, Property, Reputation, Command

Practice — Strengthening the things in your control. Try Intermittent Fasting —  work up to fasting for sixteen hours each day.

4. Memento Mori  

Remember you are mortal. 

Remember you are going to die. 

Practice — Thinking about your death, dwelling on it in detail. Thinking about it puts it in perspective. Thinking about it removes the fear. 

5. Keep a Journal

You would not think it, but keeping a journal will change your life. 

Practice — At the end of each day writing your thoughts down. Hide nothing from yourself, pass nothing by.

6. View From Above 

Don’t sweat the small stuff and its mostly small stuff. 

Practice — Think about all that befalls you with a cosmic perception — as in all that is happening in the universe. Suddenly, the nagging comments of your in-laws, your irritating work colleagues, the traffic — you will see it as the trivial shit it is. 

7. Amor Fati

Love Fate. We worry about the future. We worry about the outcome. 

Practice– Embrace the outcome whatever it is. This is not nihilistic. You can have ambitions, but if they don’t map out as you expected, embrace where they do map out to. 

By the way, this is not medical advice, it is Philosophy

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